People

A honeycomb covered in honey from Ames Farm

The end of October is a big time of year for Brian Fredericksen of Ames Farm. That’s about the time he loads hundreds of beehives onto a truck headed for Texas.

Gary Ezell, owner and chef at Joey Nova’s, is a familiar and active member of the Excelsior-Lake Minnetonka community.  His fellow citizens describe Ezell as a “true gem” and the “poster child for the chamber’s goodwill and prosperity.” Consequently, earlier this year, Ezell was selected as the P

This past spring break, I had the opportunity to take the trip of a lifetime: a 10-day trip to Spain. I had been preparing for a trip like this since I started Spanish Immersion in kindergarten.

After earning a master of fine arts in vocal performance in 1979, Teresa Elsbernd, a Shorewood resident, planned to teach singing at the college level. Due to a shortage of jobs, however, she decided to pursue music as a hobby and entered the world of sales instead.

The Lake Minnetonka Conservation District works to protect and preserve our beloved lake. The woman behind it all is Vickie Schleuning, Lake Minnetonka Conservation District’s new executive director.

I am Irish. Catholic. Born in Minnesota. I have written since I was in high school. So at a young age, I had to come to terms with F. Scott Fitzgerald.

As a young boxer in Oklahoma, Willie Carter knew that if he wanted to make his mark in the boxing world, he needed to align himself with the best. Or in this case, the greatest.

Karen Huntington is retiring after 55 years of providing childcare to the families of Excelsior. In January 1962, Huntington first began to care for children in her home.

Inside SubText Books in downtown Saint Paul, literary quotes travel along the walls just under the ceiling. Someone handwrote them—in blocky, bubbly or arabesque fonts—reaching up and pressing chalk to the ribbon-like chalkboard, one stick at a time.

How long does it take to make leather shoes from scratch? “Everyone tries to calculate the steps—250, maybe 287,” says shoemaker Amara Hark-Weber with a laugh. At her studio in Frogtown, Hark-Weber spends between 40 and 60 hours crafting one pair.

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