Issue

September 2016

From this Issue

A hot, juicy hamburger is as classic—and American—as apple pie, yet it straddles several current food trends, including the rise of comfort food and the desire for a fast, affordable meal that is made with integrity—a game we’re always upping in Seattle, especially when it comes to creativity.

September marks 25 years since Nirvana’s second studio album Nevermind crashed onto the music scene, defining grunge and solidifying Seattle as ground zero for the moody rock movement.

Painter, author and essayist Barbara Earl Thomas is among Seattle’s most emotionally evocative and socially engaged artists. Over the years, she has run the Northwest African American Museum, steered the Seattle Arts Commission and given countless spirited talks and lectures.

Poke bars are popping up everywhere, but it was still surprising to find the ultimate bowl of the traditional Hawaiian raw fish salad inside a Wallingford convenience store (former home of The Erotic Bakery)

Beer guru Kendall Jones' infographic guide to pairing your burger and brew.

“The best thing in the world is when someone makes you dinner,” says Bonny Giardina, studio manager at Hipcooks, a cooking school in South Lake Union

This cocktail is traditionally made with thick, dark, blackstrap rum, or another type of well-aged island rum.

How to use these meaty mushrooms found in the woods

Furniture designer Seth Rolland and artist Laura Yeats take inspiration from Washington's trees

You could say welder Tim Odell’s Hotspot fire pits and detachable grills were inspired by the way the wind was blowing.

Poetry, fiction, non-fiction and more!

Music festivals, the Seattle Symphony, Mindie Lind and more!

A Raisin in the Sun, Dining Among the Dead, and more of the best in theater!

Ezra Dickinson, ballet, modern dance, and more must-see performances.

The best tech-related events, and an interview with hilarious novelist Maria Semple

Every autumn, our city’s numerous and diverse film festivals present hundreds of short features and full-length movies to Seattle audiences, opening up views into a wide, diverse spectrum of human experience.  

The leaves may not yet be falling, but the calendar is filling up with dates—a sure sign that the new season of theater, dance, music and more is upon us. This year doesn’t disappoint. From a new book by a Seattle transplant with a wicked sense of the absurd to a show in which the living and the dead cross paths, Seattle’s fall arts offerings will have you laughing, thinking and applauding.

Since 2014, MadArt Studio has operated a storefront in South Lake Union where selected local artists are given a residency of several months to create large-scale, site-specific sculpture and installation work.

Hotel guests will feel like they’re checking into the great outdoors with the debut of the W Seattle’s Pacific Northwest–inspired guestroom renovations. Each of the 415 guest rooms and nine suites of the downtown hotel have been redesigned to reflect Seattle’s history of aeronautical innovation and outdoor recreation.

Seattle has long been known as a book lover’s haven, and Sasquatch Books, a venerated local publishing company, has played a major role in helping to mold and shape the city’s lit life. For three decades, Sasquatch has been introducing new and unique titles to the region’s (and lately, the nation’s) readers, while cultivating some of the Pacific Northwest’s top creative talent.

You know when couples or friends go wine tasting and there’s always one person who would rather be drinking a beer? Two worlds finally collide at Des Voigne Cellars and B-Side Brewing, a first-of-its-kind in the area boutique winery and craft brewery in Woodinville’s Winery Warehouse district on Artisan Hill.

When the doors open wide at this waterfront residence on one of the San Juan Islands, it’s hard to tell where the indoors ends and the outdoors begins. Sliding glass panels at both the north- and south-facing sides of the1,600-square-foot house retract to open up the entire living area to the sights and sounds of Rosario Strait’s rocky shore.

The ’40s bungalow just “felt right” as soon as Shannon and Pablo Supkay walked through the front door of the 2,000-square-foot house 10 years ago in Seattle’s Lakewood neighborhood.The two-bedroom house had a cozy atmosphere, the neighborhood was familiar to the couple, and they were instantly charmed by the peaceful Lake Washington view.

After commuting to Seattle for work five days a week, Scott Edwards heads north to the Skagit Valley for some rural R&R. Edwards, managing principal for Dovetail General Contractors, and his wife had lived within the Seattle city limits for 10 years, but when their daughters, now 17 and 14, came along, they decided to take their flock afield.

With Laura Yeats' touch, madrona trees become beautiful vessels

For 20 years, Seattle’s Hugo House has served as an urban writer’s retreat at its Capitol Hill location across from Cal Anderson Park, sponsoring and hosting a wide variety of events, residencies and services for readers and writers alike.

Finding a better way to protect football players from concussion and traumatic brain injury is a priority for players and coaches alike. Seattle-based startup Vicis, founded in 2013, may have an answer: a cutting-edge helmet.

There's no shortage of tech innovation in Seattle, but one new “start-up” is cloaked as something different: a fashion collection. Inspired by modern Japanese design, Buki brand is a sportswear line for men and women in which architectural silhouettes are paired with leading-edge fiber technology.

If you’re always misplacing your reading glasses, perhaps it’s a subconscious habit, because, let’s face it, those neck chains aren’t the most attractive accessories. That’s why Mercer Island resident Michele Smith decided to design a more stylish alternative.

Where: Portland, Oregon, about a three-hour drive south of downtown Seattle.

The Washington distillery industry is full of great stories about how and why people decided to start up their stills. Colin Campbell, distiller and owner of Cadée Distillery, has a story that goes back farther than most. He is a member of a clan in Scotland that has been crafting spirits since 1494.

A twinge of jealousy struck me upon entering East Anchor Seafood, Kayley Turkheimer and Brian Clevenger’s tiny seafood market and oyster bar in Madrona.

With additional reporting by Jake Laycock

For 40 years, we’ve watched the Seahawks lose (2-12 in their first season) and win a lot, making it to postseason play in 10 of the past 13 seasons.

One of the Pacific Northwest’s largest stand-up paddleboarding events returns September 17, when about 300 serious paddleboarders will wend their way around Mercer Island (aka The Rock) on a 13-mile course through Lake Washington’s sometimes choppy waters.

Seattle is undergoing unprecedented growth, at least in recent times. A Downtown Seattle Association (DSA) midyear report found there are currently 65 building projects under construction in the downtown core alone—even more by the time you read this. Projects are popping up at the rate of one per week. Many of us have stopped counting the cranes.

“We wanted to buy the worst possible property,” says Jody Estes, reminiscing about the house hunt she and her husband began in July 2007.

On a bright afternoon at the Ballard library, constituents arrive in a steady stream for their chance to speak for 10–15 minutes with Seattle City Council member Mike O’Brien, who represents northwest Seattle’s District 6. He’s holding his in-district “office hours” for constituents.

When Rose Dennis’ 12-year-old son developed leukemia, it seemed that nothing in the world could be scarier. But she was wrong. Now 30 years old, her son is addicted to heroin, an addiction that had its roots in the opioid pain medication his physicians prescribed to help him deal with the cancer.

Now in its 46th year, Seattle’s behemoth music and arts festival returns to Seattle Center for Labor Day weekend (September 2-4). This year’s headliners include some hometown heroes: hip-hop duo Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, and Bellingham indie rockers Death Cab for Cutie.