Issue

August 2016

Gourmet Getaways

Countryside wine tasting, escape to island dining, and foodie hot spots in Vancouver B.C., and Portland

From this Issue

Matt Costello, the longtime genius chef behind the food at The Inn at Langley (Langley, 400 First St.; 360.221.3033; innatlangley.com) is known for his disarming combinations made with ingredients primarily from Whidbey Island.

When you feel compelled to leave the city and immerse yourself in nature, when you seek to sit in quiet amazement at the wondrous foraged and farm-raised foods our Pacific Coast region provides, and to be waited on with warmth by a knowing staff but without the formality of a fussy setting, it’s time to make a trip to the Willows Inn.

Years before the current farm-to-table trend hit Seattle, Rick and Lora Lea Misterly were carting baskets of their small-batch goat cheese from their farm in Rice, Washington, to the kitchen doors of small, chef-owned restaurants around the city. Today, after the farm’s 25 years of slow but steady growth, cheese isn’t the only thing they transport across the mountains.

For an obsessive home baker, visiting King Arthur Flour’s flagship campus in Norwich, Vermont, was something of a religious pilgrimage worthy of the hours-long detour I took during my Boston vacation last year.

Eating your fill takes on a whole new meaning when you travel to these destinations. It’s all about the food you experience, from highbrow to low and everything in between.

The Seattle Art Fair returns for a second year, with representation from blue-chip contemporary art galleries, such as David Zwirner and the Zürcher Gallery, and more events and exhibits than before.

When Eric Tanaka, executive chef and business partner for Tom Douglas’ restaurant group, suggested that it might be interesting to create a frozen sake juice box (as seen in Japan), Adam Chumas ran with the idea. But instead of a juice box, the bar director for Tom Douglas Restaurants proposed adding sake to a slushy machine.

Strolling around Green Lake these days is generally a peaceful pursuit, with most of the action coming from kids playing in the water, kayakers paddling by or the occasional family of ducks flapping around. But at the lake’s southwestern edge, you’ll find the remnants of a historic theater that made a real splash in its day.

Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park, with its sweeping views of Elliott Bay, is always an enchanting place to enjoy a warm summer evening surrounded by art. This month, it will host several new works of art when Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB) presents “Sculptured Dance” on August 11.

Just in time to help us warm up for some Team USA fist pumping during this summer’s Olympic Games, PBS’s American Experience series of historical documentaries presents an episode celebrating a group of athletes who hold a special place in local hearts.

When you spot the sleek, modern, single-story building just off Ballard Avenue, it looks much like the craft breweries that dot the neighborhood. Inside, smiling staff members in black polo shirts stand behind the cherrywood-paneled bar in a bright, airy space with polished concrete floors, ready to help you find something to help you unwind after a long day.

When the historic 1914 Smith Tower reopens its 35th-floor observation deck after a recent overhaul, a new 1920s, Prohibition-inspired eatery and bar will be unveiled. Will there be flappers, gin fizzes and jazz? The folks at Unico Properties, which bought the building in 2015, were tight-lipped on the details at press time.

You may have visited Tacoma to take in the acclaimed Museum of Glass, or to spend a sunny afternoon at Point Defiance Park. But there are other reasons to make the trek south. Discover the historic heart and soul of this working-class city through its old-school restaurants, bars, shops and venues that have entertained locals for decades.

Last February, as Nordstrom’s downtown Seattle flagship was in the thick of a significant renovation, which had begun in spring 2014, there was a moment when you could stand in the center of the store with one foot in the old design and one in the new. To the right: 12-by-12-inch beige marble tile floors, little natural light and office-like ceiling tiles.

Here are the award-winning wines you should be buying now

Nominations for this year’s Washington State Wine Awards in the Winery and Winemaker, Red Wine, White Wine, Sparkling Wine and Rosé categories were solicited via survey from a panel of Washington wine and food professionals. The top vote-getters were selected as winners.

After back-to-back cool vintages in 2010 and 2011, Washington has seen a four-year run (2012–2015) in which each vintage has been warmer than the last.

Ten years ago, Josh Henderson left a sweet gig cooking for photographers on location in Los Angeles to start a little truck in Seattle called Skillet.

Come summertime at Mark Takagi's house, you’ll find sangría. And lots of it.

“It’s the perfect, refreshing, unpretentious drink on a sunny afternoon,” says Takagi, a wine, beer and spirits specialist of 26 years for Metropolitan Market. “I drink pitchers of it all summer long.”

Try this savory white sangria with peaches, ginger, lime and WA wine

Ice cream may be the queen of summer treats, but a really good ice pop is equally glorious on a sunny day. Holding one instantly makes me feel like I’m 5 years old again. Maybe it’s because time slows down with every icy lick. Many of today’s locally made versions are crafted with natural, organic ingredients.

The result?

 

When Helena Scutt competes in this month’s Olympic games the pace will be very different from the leisurely sails she took with her family as a child, when they’d head to Ivar’s Salmon House on Lake Union for lunch from Leschi where their boat was moored.

The NPS has stewarded some of the country’s most beautiful and breathtaking public lands for 100 years, including Washington’s beloved Mount Rainier, Olympic and North Cascades national parks.

As so many of the low-rise, century-old buildings in Seattle’s core meet their inevitable end with the wrecking ball and are replaced with taller, shinier and sharper-edged structures, some of the city’s history is swept away with the dust and discarded rubble. But at least one building that has been a part of many Seattleites’ memories is escaping this fate.

In 2012, New York restaurateur Marc Meyer tapped Chester Gerl, then chef at Matt’s in the Market, to run the kitchen at his trendy SoHo restaurant, Hundred Acres, and, eventually, to help open Rosie’s, a restaurant specializing in central and southern Mexico cuisine, in the East Village.

Metropolitan Grill’s newest sibling restaurant brings cocktail and food pairings to the table

The recent overhaul of the the historic 1914 Smith Tower includes new cocktail bar

This election season seems to have a theme of walls. Donald Trump has proposed building a tall, “beautiful” wall along the United States’ border with Mexico. Some Washingtonians have joked that if Trump becomes president, they’ll build their own wall along the Columbia River.

The night she was at a Seattle bar and left her seat to visit the restroom, Leah didn’t expect the man sitting next to her would spike her drink while she was away. Nor did she expect him to rape her later at his apartment. She has only flashes of memory about how she got there. She does remember telling him she didn’t want sex.

The Ballard bistro pours out a 'Corpse Reviver' twist

On Wednesdays, the mood of the midday crowd at Seattle’s Frye Art Museum on First Hill is contemplative. Many people aren’t there to peruse the most recent art exhibit—currently, of works by Danish Symbolist painter Vilhelm Hammershøi. They won’t see a film, or take in a lecture. Instead, they’ll spend half an hour in a darkened auditorium, where they won’t see much of anything.

Bellevue, the hub of the Eastside, has a downtown filled with high-tech corporate headquarters, luxury shopping centers and an ever increasing residential density. But tucked into this city’s growing skyline is a small neighborhood that reminds Bellevue of its small-town suburban beginnings.

SCHOOL TIES: Ken Downing, senior vice president and fashion director of Neiman Marcus, admits that, while growing up in Seward Park, Seattle seemed like the last place from which to launch his career. “I felt like I was in the furthest most corner of nowhere,” he says.

After 23 years of taming tresses on the corner of Blanchard and First in Belltown, Gary Manuel Salon opens in August in its new location in Pioneer Square.

WHERE: Long Beach, a small town in the southern coastal corner of Washington, a three-and-a-half-hour drive from downtown Seattle.