arts

Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park, with its sweeping views of Elliott Bay, is always an enchanting place to enjoy a warm summer evening surrounded by art.

Standing in a pretty park on the west bank of the Duwamish River on an unseasonably warm day in June, it’s impossible to ignore a tremendous crashing sound coming from the abutting industrial area.

Presumably, one of the cool things about being Paul Allen is having enough money to fund all of your interests.

Aside from the pink flamingos flanking the walkway, there’s nothing particularly telltale about the exterior of the studio where one of Seattle’s musical masterminds works his mad science.

Among the many signs that spring has arrived are the wealth of excellent performances, exhibits and concerts suddenly competing for space in our calendars.

The Harvard Exit, which screened its final film in mid-January, didn’t start out as an art house movie theater.

“There’s sometimes a misconception that this is an uplifting show,” Ahamefule “Aham” Oluo says. A smile curls at the edges of his deadpan voice, but it comes from a place of sincerity, not scorn.

What’s your favorite current Seattle band? If you have trouble answering (or if you draw a blank after Macklemore), we’re not going to judge. But we are going to suggest it’s time to check in with the city’s thriving indie music scene.

The messenger angel in Tony Kushner’s play Angels in America makes a famously big entrance when she first appears—crashing through the roof of an apartment building to convey her prophecy to a gay man struggling with AIDS in 1980s Manhatt

For the past 45 years, young women—mostly First Nations—have disappeared along Highway 16 in British Columbia. Some were found murdered, others were never seen again.