Fall Arts Preview 2016: Music

Sounds to fit anyone's fancy
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Music-ability - Mindie Lind

The tradition of American singers who first found their calling at church and continue to draw on their early experiences at places of worship, is as old as America itself. Whether the faith is maintained or lost, the language of higher love and the promise of redemption remain. Here in the decidedly nonreligious city of Seattle, the dark, bluesy and often irreverent singer/songwriter/pianist Mindie Lind—who was raised in a large, churchgoing Southern Baptist family and discovered music within the confines of the church—has established herself as powerful voice in the local music scene.

Lind was born without legs and gets around town, deftly, on a skateboard. While her songs do not overtly address her condition, the lyrics of songs such as “Recluse,” “Mississippi Misfit,” “Lowlands” and “Hunger and Fed” offer a sublime and emotionally nuanced account of otherness that immediately strikes a chord with listeners. As with many great American musical artists, Lind combines the spirit of the blues with the metaphoric language of gospel and a subtle sense of humor.  

In 2014, Lind’s career got a boost when she was chosen to tour with Lena Dunham in support of her book, Not That Kind of Girl after responding to a call for artists on Dunham’s website.

Lind will perform at Macefield Music Festival, named for Edith Macefield, the elderly Ballard resident who gained national notoriety for refusing to sell her modest home to developers and became an icon of resistance. The festival runs 9/30–10/2 and takes place on an outdoor stage in Ballard and at a number of indoor venues. $45; macefieldmusicfestival.com   

The best in music

(Jazz) Chick Corea Trio with Eddie Gomez & Brian Blade
10/4–10/5 Keyboardist, composer and bandleader Chick Corea, winner of countless awards and fluent in a wide range of styles—from straight-ahead to avant-garde, bebop to jazz-rock fusion, children’s songs to chamber and symphonic works—comes to Jazz Alley to pay tribute to the legendary Bill Evans with former Evans bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Brian Blade. Times and prices vary. Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley, downtown, 2033 Sixth Ave.; 206.441.9729; jazzalley.com 
 
(Jazz) Earshot Jazz Festival
10/7–11/11 This year’s festival, now in its 28th year and with more than 50 performances scheduled at venues throughout the city, promises to be another blowout event, with jazz that ranges from classic to experimental. This year’s performers include Rudresh Mahanthappa, Steve Lehman Trio, Fred Hersch, Kris Davis and Craig Taborn, Manuel Valera Trio, Rez Abassi Trio, Renee Baker, Dave Douglas with The Westerlies, and Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra. Times and prices vary. Various locations; 206.574.6763; earshot.org
 
(Jazz) Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis
10/13 Jazz trumpeter, historian and educator Wynton Marsalis arrives in Seattle with his big band of distinguished soloists to play a broad repertoire of compositions by historic jazz legends. 7:30 p.m. Prices vary. Paramount Theatre, downtown, 911 Pine St.; 206.682.1414; stgpresents.org 

(Jazz) McCoy Tyner
10/13–10/16 Legendary pianist, composer and bandleader McCoy Tyner is one of jazz’s most sublime practitioners. His musical career began more than 50 years ago when he played on John Coltrane’s groundbreaking recording A Love Supreme. But that was only the beginning of his story, as his style has continued to evolve alongside an ever-expanding musical world. His stand at Jazz Alley is not to be missed. Times vary. $40. Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley, downtown, 2033 Sixth Ave.; 206.441.9729; jazzalley.com 

(Vocal) Burt Bacharach

10/20–10/23 Bacharach, along with his songwriting partner, the late lyricist Hal David, defined the pop sound of the 1960s as much as any artist other than John Lennon and Paul McCartney. The 88-year-old composer—and winner of six Grammys and three Oscars—will perform for three nights within the intimate confines of Jazz Alley. Times and prices vary. Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley, downtown, 2033 Sixth Ave.; 206.441.9729; jazzalley.com

(Classical Indian) Zakir Hussain & Nilardri Kumar
10/23 Percussionist and tabla player Zakir Hussain has, for decades, been a leading figure in the world of classical Indian music, accompanying all of its greatest musicians and dancers in concert. He has also been a key figure in the development of the world music movement. On his current tour, he is joined by sitar master Niladri Kumar. 5 p.m.  Prices vary. Moore Theatre, downtown, 1932 Second Ave.; 206.682.1414; stgpresents.org 

(Soul/funk) Maceo Parker with Jones Family Singers
10/29 Saxophonist Maceo Parker—who has collaborated with the likes of James Brown, George Clinton and Prince—is a master of soul and funk. His current tour showcases a repertoire spanning his long career. On stage with Parker will be The Jones Family Singers: five sisters, two brothers and their father, who have been tearing up churches and festivals alike for more than two decades. 8 p.m. Prices vary. Moore Theatre, downtown, 1932 Second Ave.; 206.682.1414; stgpresents.org

(Jazz guitar) Bill Frisell
11/5 Seattle resident Bill Frisell, one of the greatest, most expressive jazz guitarists of our time, has a style that runs the gamut from the experimental to the atmospheric to the melodic. But he always remains anchored in his blues and folk traditions. Frisell will perform for one night at The Moore with Petra Haden, Thomas Morgan and Rudy Royston in support of his latest recording, When You Wish Upon a Star. The album is devoted to standards drawn from movies and television, a genre Frisell treats with awe and reverence. 8 p.m. Prices vary. Moore Theatre, downtown, 1932 Second Ave.; 206.682.1414; stgpresents.org 

(Blues) Taj Mahal Trio 
11/18–11/27 For half a century, multi-instrumentalist and two-time Grammy Award winner Taj Mahal has offered enthusiastic listeners his unique blend of blues, folk, roots, Caribbean rhythms and world music. At age 74, he continues to tour, playing with a trio that includes Bill Rich on bass and Kester Smith on drums. Times and prices vary. Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley, downtown, 2033 Sixth Ave.; 206.441.9729; jazzalley.com

The best in classical

(Symphony) Yo-Yo Ma
10/14 The world’s most famous cellist performs Bartók’s Romanian folk dances as well as works by Mozart and Haydn with the Seattle Symphony, conducted by Pablo Rus Broseta. 8 p.m. Prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; 206.215.4700; seattlesymphony.org 
 
(Opera) Hansel & Gretel
10/15–10/30 Not seen at Seattle Opera for 23 years, Engelbert Humperdinck’s adaptation of the iconic Grimm story returns to explore themes of poverty, peril and bravery. Laurent Pelly’s production celebrates the richness of imagination and offers entertaining commentary on the pitfalls of consumerism in the modern world. Times and prices vary. McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, 321 Mercer St.; 206.389.7676; seattleopera.org

(Symphony) Perlman conducts Mozart's Requiem
10/15–10/16 Come to hear violinist Itzhak Perlman, one of the giants of classical music, play a concerto by Bach, then conduct the Seattle Symphony in a performance of Mozart’s swan song, the Requiem, which still captivates audiences like no other composition. Times and prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; 206.215.4700; seattlesymphony.org 
 
(Baroque) Handel's Water Music
10/21–10/22 The Seattle Symphony, conducted by organist Richard Egarr, performs an evening of Baroque classics by Handel, Purcell, Laws and Biber. These compositions will be paired with exquisite wine tastings in the Samuel & Althea Stroum Grand Lobby. 8 p.m. Prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; 206.215.4700; seattlesymphony.org

(Symphony) Morlot conducts Beethoven
10/27, 10/29 The Seattle Symphony performs Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto and Second Symphony, two pivotal works, followed by Polish-born composer and soprano Agata Zubel’s brand-new orchestral work, In the Shade of an Unshed Tear. Conducted by musical director Ludovic Morlot and featuring pianist Inon Barnatan. Times and prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; 206.215.4700; seattlesymphony.org

(Symphony) Morlot conducts Tchaikovsky
11/3, 11/5–11/6 Ludovic Morlot conducts Seattle Symphony’s performance of Tchaikovsky’s introspective and ultimately triumphant Fifth Symphony, along with Sibelius’ Violin Concerto, featuring violinist Sergey Khachatryan. Times and prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; 206.215.4700; seattlesymphony.org

(Symphony) Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition
11/10, 11/12 Alan Buribayev conducts the Seattle Symphony in a performance of Mussorgsky’s grief-stricken and visually expressive masterpiece, featuring Sol Gabetta on cello. Times and prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; 206.215.4700; seattlesymphony.org 

Early Music Sequentia: The Monk Sings the Pagan 
11/12–11/13 Medieval music ensemble Sequentia collaborates with noted scholars to reconstruct classical texts sung in European monastic centers between the ninth and 12th centuries. Experience songs of Fortuna, Dido, Cleopatra, Hercules and others as they would have been enjoyed around the turn of the first millennium. Times and prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; earlymusicguild.org 
 
Chamber Music Ravel & Mozart 
11/15 Hear the musicians of Seattle Symphony perform chamber works by Mozart, Ravel and two Soviet composers—Sofia Gubaidulina and Alfred Schnittke—in the intimate Illsley Ball Nordstrom Recital Hall. 7:30 p.m. Prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; 206.215.4700; seattlesymphony.org 
 
Symphony Rachmaninov No. 4
11/17–11/19 Shostakovich’s monumental Symphony No. 11 reaches back from Soviet Russia to the explosive Revolution of 1905, while Rachmaninov’s final piano concerto revives Old World grandeur. Mikhail Agrest conducts Seattle Symphony, with pianist Lucas Debargue. Times and prices vary. Benaroya Hall, downtown, 200 University St.; 206.215.4700; seattlesymphony.org

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